Flowering Tasmannia lanceolata
Tasmanian Mountain Pepper (Tasmannia lanceolata) is a small tree native to Tasmania and mountainous parts of southeastern Australia. There are both male and female plants and so only the females produce the distinctively spicy hot peppercorns. However, the leaves (dried or fresh) can also have high concentrations of the hot polygodial and so can also be used to enhance the flavours of dishes. There are huge differences in the level of 'heat' produced by individual plants in the bush so buy with care (click here).
 
For more information there is a useful 'tech note' from the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation (RIRDC) of Australia here.
 
Male and Female plants.  Mountain pepper plants are either male or female, and of course, both are needed in order for the female plants to produce the spicy hot pepperberries which are dried after harvest to produce the grindable peppercorns. See our video of male and female flowering in our plantation by clicking here.
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Health & Nutrition
tasmanian_mountain_peppers_2017v5a008007.gif Tasmanian Mountain Pepper plants at 1150 m altitude on Mt. Arthur (Tasmania)
Tasmanian Mountain Pepper growing at 1100 m elevation on Mt. Arthur
Male Tasmanian Mountain Pepper flowers
Male flowers:
Female Tasmanian Mountain Pepper flowers
Female flowers:
 
Tasmanian Mountain Pepper ready for Harvest.  The dark, almost black-skinned pepperberries are really deep, dark red.  When crushed, the pepperberries can add colour as well as flavour to cooking, vinegars, etc.  The dried pepper still retains some of this colour.
Pepperberries ready for harvest (Tasmannia lanceolata) Wild Tassie Mountain Pepper trees
7 m tall Tasmanian Mountain Pepper growing in a bush block on Bronzewing Farm
There are some good publications of the biochemistry of the Mountain Pepper's heat:
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